Canada’s Cultural Movement

The Growth of a Prosperous Country

After World War Two, Canada was determined to create its own cultural identity, one separate from colonial rule. At the same time, Canada did not want American culture to define its identity (Canadian Royal Commission).  Between 1946 and 1963, the government afforded prosperity and security through incentives, protection, and the promotion of Canadian artists.  This made the country more secure and prosperous.
Incentives, security, and promotion all allow culture to grow, and a growing culture is a sign of prosperity. Government incentives in the arts afforded prosperity because there was a reward system that encouraged Canadians to produce work. (Canada Council for the Arts).  The Canadian Council for the Arts states:
“The objects of the Council are to foster and promote the study and enjoyment of, and the production of works in, the arts and, in particular, but without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the Council may, in furtherance of its objects (Canada Council for the Arts).”
The excerpt clearly states that a dedicated council has the sole goal of promoting Canadian work.   One way to interpret this message is that it makes going into the arts appealing. How is this achieved? The excerpt gives clear examples such as monetary reward to artists; section B states:

Provide, through appropriate organizations or otherwise, for grants, scholarships or loans to persons in Canada for study or research in the arts in Canada or elsewhere or to persons in other countries for study or research in the arts in Canada;

This Excerpt not only encourages citizens to pursue their craft, but it also encourages unemployed artists from around the world to start up their career in Canada. The act was put into place in order to protect Canada’s own artists and reward them for their inspiration. This way, the country will prosper and flourish an array of talent.

Canadian talent was protected by ensuring American influence didn’t consume society. Laws were put into place in order to immerse Canadians in their culture. The idea was to “Canadianize our airwaves” and steer clear of other predominant cultures that greatly influence the world, primarily The United States (The Canadian Royal Commission).

That the Board of Governors of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation investigate ways of ensuring that private radio broadcasters employ more Canadian talent. (Canadian Royal Commission)

Allowing more airtime with strictly Canadian content would result in a more prosperous and independent identity, without having to rely on American culture. One way to promote this was replacing American Culture with French Canadian Culture (Canadian Royal Commission). Through discussion attempting to build an identity, it was decided that Canadian radio was required to broadcast in both French and English. (CBC radio) This ensured that there was a secure artistic environment, which respected Canadian talent. In addition, French culture was a vital part of Canadian identity, however, it was ignored by most. The idea of having radio in both languages was to unify the two cultures to create one proud and multicultural identity.

Artists such as Paul Anka were praised and promoted in order to prove that Canada had talent of its own. On the poster regarding an upcoming show, we see that the poster was promoting a concert in Honolulu Hawaii, an American city. This proves that not only did Paul Anka influence internally, but he also impacted externally as well. He was able to radiate talent to the other side of the continent. The poster also uses the term “Hits” in bold red letters, which indicates his success. (Paul Anka Concert poster) This truly proved Canada’s ability to thrive as a nation securely, and show the world that Canadians did not need to rely on other influences to shape the countries identity.

Paul Anka is just one example of a Canadian artist at the time. He was one of many to succeed in the industry. He proved to fellow Canadians and people of other cultures that Canada was prosperous by becoming a booming success. Canadians could now turn to their own independent talent for inspiration.

Canada was able to further develop a prosperous and secure identity through incentives, protection and promotion of arts and culture, which ultimately created work. We see the country’s determination in creating a heritage enhanced with arts, separate from other prominent cultures. Canada was able to fulfill its aspirations in becoming an independent, secure and prosperous country.

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Throughout the time span of 1946 to 1963, Canadian Culture managed to go through both a period of cultural insecurity and security. Up until 1951 when the Massey report was released Canadian culture was drowned out by the vast, and rapidly growing American film, radio, music, art and entertainment industries. The Massey report educated the public of Canada’s current cultural state and what needed to be done to improve our cultural status. After the report, Canada produced more bilingual television program, created more radio stations, and many talented Canadian artists arose such as Paul Anka.

First of all, Canada experienced both cultural security and insecurity over the 17-year period. Prosperity and Security for Canadian Culture is considered to have a thriving entertainment, music, art, radio, film, and news industries. It was also important to establish and maintain Canadian traditions, customs, and values. In other words, it was important to have certain aspects of the culture that Canada would be famous for. In present day traditions such as hockey, saying “eh”, snow, and Tim Horton’s is what Canada is currently known for.

Before the Massey report Canadian art and entertainment industries were threatened and disregarded as the United States dominated. The Massey report determined that the major problem was that radio stations were limited and only in major Canadian cities. Another other major problem was that Canadian artists did not tour between small Canadian centers, this was because of the cost of traveling as touring in a country with vast distances between locations was very costly. The lack of Canadian artist touring was also due to the US dominating concert life in Canada. Therefore Canadians had little interest in Canadian musician because they were never exposed to their songs, popularity or success. This cycle made it very hard for new Canadian musicians to break in to the music scene.

After the Massey Report Canadian Culture made a drastic recovery. The report recommended that Canadian broadcasting corporations continue with plan to produce more television programs in both English and French so that they could be broadcasted nationwide. It also recommends that Radio broadcasters develop more radio programs in cities other than Toronto and Montreal. The final recommendation was to employ more Canadian musicians at concert venues and to play more Canadian music on the radios. After the recommendations were followed Canadian culture moved into a state of security. There was a large variety of radio stations throughout Canada, television programs were made bilingual, the amount of Canadian concerts increased and popularity grew of new Canadian artist. A Canadian artist whose success soared was Paul Anka. At the time he was a young boy from Ottawa. He wrote songs targeted at young teens. His song “Put Your Head on My Shoulders” was a national hit and his lyrics could be interpreted at the behavior of a typical teenager during that time. It is a glimpse into the mindset, values, culture and lives of these teenagers.

In conclusion, Canadian culture experienced both security and insecurity over the 17-year period. At first Canadian culture was practically invisible and we were immersed and overwhelmed with American TV, radio, and artists. After the Massey report determined Canada’s cultural issues and made suggestions, Canada quickly solved the problems and moved into a period of cultural prosperity and security.

Bibliography/Sources

· “ARCHIVED – Report of the Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters, and Sciences.” Bienvenue au site Web Bibliothèque et Archives Canada / Welcome to the Library and Archives Canada website. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Mar. 2013. <http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/massey/h5-400-e.html&gt;.

· “Massey Commission – The Canadian Encyclopedia.” The Canadian Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Mar. 2013. <http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/articles/emc/massey-commission&gt;.

· “Massey Report (Canadian government document) — Britannica Online Encyclopedia.” Britannica Online Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Mar. 2013. <http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/1074931/Massey-Report&gt;.

· “Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters and Sciences – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.” Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Mar. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Commission_on_National_Development_in_the_Arts,_Letters_and_Sciences&gt;.

· Vance, Jonathan Franklin William. A history of Canadian culture. Don Mills, Ont.: Oxford University Press, 2009. Print.

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The definition of security and prosperity is partaking in a stable job. Being competent to provide money for rent and utility’s in your household. Having the salary to afford goods such as groceries. A life with no propaganda and no hate between countries. Being able to not live in constant fear. Peace between countries around the world. To have security and prosperity all of these things must be taking place in your household and your country. Canadians living in 1946 to 1963 lived a life without security and prosperity because there were lots of propaganda posters mesmerizing adults and kids; a pure hatred between Christians and Russian communists; but most of all the fear of war breaking out.

imageA life with security and prosperity does not have propaganda posters encouraging young adults to get involved with one of the most brutal and gruesome things, war. Both of my primary sources are attempting to convince young men to join the navy or the air force. These posters are promising that if you join the army the fight against communism will end. The creators of the posters state that communism is ruining the ideology of Christianity. If young men are to join the army Christianity can be kept alive and in its well-being. The other primary source attempts to convince young men that communism is twisting kids education system. The average Canadian cannot live a peaceful life filled with security and prosperity if posters that spread hate surround them.

Not only did propaganda make the average Canadianimage life hard during the 1940’s to 1960’s but also the hatred between the Russian communists and Canadian Christians made it even harder. One of the primary sources is convincing Canadian Christians that communism is ruining their religion and the only way to stop this from happening is to join the army. “To communism, Christian countries present a lush target.” The majority of Canadians are Christians so this poster has a very broad audience in Canada. This poster emboldens hatred between the communists and Canadian Christians and this makes it very difficult for the ordinary Canadian to have security and prosperity with the tension between these countries.

Living a life with security and prosperity does not include living a life in constant fear of nuclear bombs. During these times people were highly encouraged to join the army to fight the war against communism as you can see in the primary sources. Nuclear bombs were a constant threat and the people were scared. Bomb shelters were quite common and recommended in case nuclear war did break out. The tension was indescribable. As George Orwell said “A peace that is no peace.” Russia and America were ready to launch their nuclear missiles and this spread fear throughout the world. Security and prosperity do not involve fear within the ordinary Canadian. Between 1946 and 1963 Canadians did not have the opportunity to live a life with security and prosperity due to the constant terror of nuclear bombs ready to be launched.

Canadians living from 1946 to 1963 did not live in a life full of security and prosperity. Canadians at this time did not experience security and prosperity because there were lots of propaganda posters compelling adults and kids; a pure dislike between Christians and Russian communists; but most of all the horror of war breaking out.

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During the years 1946 to 1963, Canadians experienced a high level of prosperity among the average citizen, yet felt insecurity in the face of increasing American power. This is seen when analyzing the study of Canadian culture at the time by the Report of the Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters, and Sciences (better known as the Massey Report), which increased the amount of insecurity among Canadians.

What is prosperity, as seen in this time period? It reveals itself in the rise of consumerism, materialism, and the investment in cultural items. We see the average citizen having a well-paying job that allows them to purchase luxurious items such as radios and televisions. However, without radio and television programs, the devices would be useless, and therefore a fair amount of money was placed into creating Canadian cultural content for Canadian viewers. Such as seen in the Massey Report, where it is stated “the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation [should] proceed with plans for the production of television programmes in French and English for national coverage” (303). Within the report, there are also recommendations of further developing radio programs that originate from places other than the corporate centrals of Toronto and Montreal. This shows that the government felt that the country was prospering enough to support an expansion and the possible risks that come with it. In the Massey Report, it is also said that “the Board of Governors of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation investigate ways of ensuring that private radio broadcasters employ more Canadian talent” (298). Focusing financial efforts towards the less popular (Kallmann) Canadian artists shows that the Canadian government and companies such as the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation had enough financial security and prosperity to risk a loss in listeners to bring in more Canadian content.

However, why would the government spend so much money on culture, other than the fact that Canada was prospering during the 1950’s?  The answer lies in the fear of Americanization, which was increased by the Massey Report. The government and the people felt financially secure and prosperous, but they didn’t feel secure as a nation. In 1947, the Canadian Citizenship Act proclaimed that Canadians were citizens of Canada, and not British subjects, officially creating the start of a newly defined Canadian culture where people could proudly say, “I am a Canadian citizen” (“Forging Our Legacy”). Unfortunately, the years 1946 to 1963 were unstable for the newly found Canadian identity with powerful America next door. At this point in time, the majority of Canadian entertainment (film, radio, periodical, etc.) came from America. According to the Massey Report, having a disproportionately large amount of our media come from an outside source “may stifle rather than stimulate our own creative effort” (18). Though it does point out that “we [Canadians] have made important progress often aided by American generosity,” it also says it may cause us to be permanently dependant on American culture and force us to “[spend] millions to maintain a national independence which would be nothing but an empty shell without a vigorous and distinctive cultural life” (18). At this time, the news that Canadians were receiving via radio programs have “no particular application to Canada or to Canadian conditions and that some of them…are positively harmful” (18), causing much unrest in the government. In fact, one of the major reasons why the commission was created was to bring this issue of Americanization and culture into the public eye. Thus, the fear of being “Americanized” was spread to the public, and the security the public felt in their newfound recognition as a country was destroyed.

By looking at the Report of the Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters, and Sciences, a study of Canadian culture, we can conclude that Canadians during the years 1946 to 1963 were prosperous but not secure in the face of rising American power.

Works Cited

Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters and Sciences 1949-1951. Rep. Ottawa: King’s Printer, 1951. Library and Archives Canada. Web. 8 Mar. 2013.

Kallmann, Helmut. “Massey Commission – The Canadian Encyclopedia.” The Canadian Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Mar. 2013.

“Forging Our Legacy: Canadian Citizenship and Immigration, 1900-1977.” Government of Canada, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Communications Branch. Government of Canada, 01 July 2006. Web. 14 Mar. 2013.

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After the war ended in 1946, different cultures started to spread worldwide. Major advancements in the radio and the mass production allowed for American and foreign broadcasting of music, television shows and theater productions to spread around the world including Canada. In 1951, Canadian Arthur Massey discovered “The American invasion by film, radio and periodical… [Canadian] radio programmes have in fact no particular application to Canada or to Canadian conditions.” Many Canadians were worried of be losing a cultural identity that they worked hard to achieve and the threat of Americanization. As a result of the Massey Commission, Canada set themselves up for cultural security in the form of cultural preservation from Americanization as well as prosperity by the formation of new companies and councils to protect our culture.

All throughout time, music has been as a way to express one’s emotions and feelings. On a global stage artists like Chuck Barry, Little Richard and Elvis Presley were becoming huge phenomenons. But in Canada, talented musicians were limited by the “the great cost of touring in a country with vast distances between cities. It was due also to the extensive domination of concert life by US agencies, whose roster of artists included few Canadians and few artists with an interest in Canadian music,” (thecanadianencyclopedia.com) leaving radio stations at the time to play the works of foreign artists especially Americans. Arthur Massey and other Canadians feared the undesirable “Americanization” of Canadian culture, and realized that changes had to be made to preserve our culture at the time.

In both of my primary sources the “Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters, and Sciences Report,” and “An Excellent Report,” written in the Lethbridge Herald, they both have a very stern but positive outlook on the Massey Report. In the National report, phrases such as “We are now spending millions to maintain a national independence which would be nothing but an empty shell without a vigorous and distinctive cultural life,” and “We must not be blind, however, to the very present danger of permanent dependence.” These quotes resonate the inevitable danger of continuing to not support Canadian culture and instead following the popular culture of the United States. In article they continue the trend of demoralizing us to realize our mistake saying “we depend far too much upon the United States for our cultural entertainment, and that we have a shocking lack of knowledge of our own country, its heritage, and its history.” However the article looks positively to the future and says “[the Report] will have a momentous effect on the future cultural and social history of our country….” From these 2 primary sources I discovered that Canada made the right move to set themselves up for security and prosperity in the future years to come.

After the report was implemented, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) expanded its empire to include television which promised to showcase Canadian talent. Prior to the first Canadian television station cities in southern Canada could receive television signals from Northern American cities such as Buffalo and Seattle. In combination with the creation of a Canadian station, there were laws in place that mandated them to broadcast a compulsory amount of Canadian television. An example of a Canadian broadcasting show that is still famous is Hockey Night in Canada. As a result Canadians were able to watch their own talents and show their own national pride.

In conclusion, the Massey Report set up Canada for a very promising future in cultural preservation and prosperity. By instituting the first of many Canadian television channels we were able for the first time to display Canada’s many talents on the world stage. Actors, musicians, even dancers would not get their chance to showcase their talents if Canada never changed their ways to support our own culture.

Bibliography

Canada. Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters, and Sciences. Report. Ottawa: King’s Printer, 1951. By permission of the Privy Council Office.

Lethbridge Herald, June 2, 1951 (http://newspaperarchive.com/lethbridge-herald/1951-06-02/page-1)

“Massey Commission – The Canadian Encyclopedia.” The Canadian Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Mar. 2013. http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/articles/emc/massey-commission.

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Prosperity and security can mean a great number of things, to different kinds of people; you probably have a different definition of it than I do. Canadians were living a life that would be considered “prosperous” and would be considered “secure” from 1946 to 1963, as politicians were promising Canadian citizens they would “Canadianize” our television and radio, awards were also being created for citizens who excelled in ‘Canadian art’ and for people who practice Canadian art internationally, and reports such as the Massey Report were being written discussing Canadian culture and how to make it thrive. Canadian culture is made up of: values, beliefs, languages, arts, sciences, traditions, institutions, and a way of life for Canadians. Prior to 1946, Canadian culture was primarily dependant on American culture, but from 1946 to 1963 Canadian culture began to flourish.

Canadian culture was in question from 1946 to 1963; Canadians wondered what it was, if we really had our own culture. Many believed that we were dependent on our neighbours to the south, the United States, for cultural entertainment, as a large majority of TV entertainers and actors, as well as, radio hosts in Canada were American. Politicians in Canada saw this as an opportunity and began campaigns where they would promise to “Canadianize” Canada’s radio and television. This opened doors for aspiring actors or singers such as Paul Anka, who went on to achieve international success and fame. Also the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, or CBC, began to produce TV programs in 1952, resulting in programs in not only English but French. Also with the creation of the CBC, they promised more Canadian talent to be employed, resulting in more Canadian viewers being exposed to their Canadian heritage. But CBC’s primary objective was to develop and promote Canadian culture in their programs, and to do so not only in urban cities such as Toronto and Montreal, but in rural areas across Canada too.

The Canada council for the Arts Acts, 1957, passage from The Canada Council Art Act by Parliament: “The objects of the Council are to foster and promote the study and enjoyment of, and the production of works in, the arts, humanities and social sciences…” This act stipulated the benefits of those individuals who study and produce works, in the arts, in Canada and around the world by providing them with such benefits, as grants, scholarships, and loans. Grants were also awarded to universities in Canada not only to assist with their arts programs, but to also expand on their facilities. Through 1957 to 1958 a total of $1.4 million was given in grants and awards. The Arts Act also allowed Canadian arts to be interpreted and represented accordingly in other countries, as well as exhibitions, performances, and publications of works in the arts were encouraged, therefore, exposing Canadian culture on an international scale.

The Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters and Sciences, or commonly referred to as the Massey Report, states specifically how American radio and film have clearly no benefit to the welfare of the average Canadian and may in fact be “positively harmful…” affecting the cultural life of our nation…a nation without a culture. On top of this it states that we have a shocking lack of knowledge of our own country, heritage, and its history. This allowed Canadians to open their eyes, and resulted in positive cultural recommendations to help build our nation’s identity while educating Canadians about their history and heritage, including exposure to Canadian painters, writers, sculptors, actors, dancers. The Massey Report also broke any links that we had to British, French or American culture, creating our own distinctive culture, that we could call, Canadian.

Prior to 1946 Canadians had little knowledge of Canadian values, beliefs, languages, arts, sciences, traditions, and institutions. However, from 1946 onwards we started to stimulate our creative efforts, and slowed the progress of Americanization in our Canadian airwaves. Canadians began to prosper in the richness of their ever growing culture, as the Government was ridding Canadian entertainment, such as radio, TV, and the arts, of any American influence while recognizing Canadians as an independent and unique culture.

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What makes a nation a nation? Is it its name, its government, its location, or is it its culture? As World War II drew to a close, Canada still struggled to identify its self on the world stage. As a new country, Canadian culture is next to none existent and with much of it imitated from America. As a result, although Canadians are secure physically because of the post war economic boom, Canadian felt insecure since the lack of culture which can easily result in Americanization. The fear is shown through Canada’s concern of its mass media, the tremendous government support towards art and the apprehension of American star’s influence.

To begin, Canada’s anxiety over its vulnerable cultural can be seen through Canadian’s response towards the Americanized mass media. After WWII, technological advancement brought radios and TVs into common household. Soon, entertainment revolves around these mass media. Thus, they become an essential part of a country’s cultural life. However, many Canadians felt that the numerous American radio programs “have in fact no particular application to Canada or to Canadian conditions and that some of them, including certain children’s programs of the “crime” and “horror” type, are positively harmful….”(“Massey”). Moreover, in 1952, when Canada began commercial television broadcasting, it brought another onslaught of American culture into Canadian living rooms with programs like the Ed Sullivan Show and I Love Lucy. The only Canadian TV station at the time, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, only carried indigenous news and public affairs that did not contribute to the Canadian entertainment industry. Thus, because of America’s heavy influence in TVs and radios, one Canadian columnist wrote “we depends fart too much upon the United States for our cultural entertainment, and that we have a shocking lack of knowledge of our own country, its heritage, and its history.” (“An”) In addition, the Messay Report states with urgency “That the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation [should] proceed with plans for the production of television programs in French and English and for national coverage… [and] that the Board of Governors of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation investigate ways of ensuring that private radio broadcasters employ more Canadian talent.” (“Massey”) Ultimately, many people were anxious because of the American’s supremacy in mass media when Canada has little of its own culture and entertainment.

In addition, Canada’s desperation to nourish its cultural is shown through its strong government supports. Early as 1949, the Canadian government, Preamble of the Order-in-Council, had stated, it is in the national interest to give encouragement to institutions which express national feeling… and add to the variety and richness of Canadian life, rural as well as urban…”(“Massey”) when establishing the Massey Commission. The concern of an American takeover is eloquently stated by the Massey Report; “We are now spending millions to maintain a national independence which would be nothing but an empty shell without a vigorous and distinctive cultural life.” (“Massey”) The report, crystallization of countless interviews across the country, summarizes Canadians’ sentiment. As a result, the Messay report aims to improve Canadian cultural through privileges and funds. The Messay report recommends that “the government provide, through appropriate organizations or otherwise, for grants, scholarships or loans to persons in Canada for study or research in the arts in Canada or elsewhere or to persons in other countries for study or research in the arts in Canada…make awards to persons in Canada for outstanding accomplishment in the arts…arrange for and sponsor exhibitions, performances and publications of works in the arts…[and] make grants to universities and similar institutions of higher learning by way of capital assistance in respect of building construction projects.” (“Massey”) Some direct results include of the report include the founding of the Canada Council 1957 to provide funding support for Canadian arts and cultural groups and individuals and the National Library to support Canadian literature. In essence, Canada’s insecurity of its own cultural is apparent as seen from the over whelming supports given starting in the 1950s.

Lastly, Canadians feared the American icons’ tremendous influence will Americanize Canada. After the war, technology advances and economic prospered. Thus people gain more time for entertainment and cultural activities. Unfortunately, although there were some Canadian talents, they were overshadowed by famous American artists and writers. The American icon spread the American culture, values and believes. Authors such as Ernest Hemingway and Author Miller’s writing styles revolutionized the literature world. Actresses such as Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor defined a generation’s value of beauty and sex. Most importantly, countless stars including Elvis became and represented America’s symbol of freedom and care-free living of the post war era. (“Culture”) The Elvis’ first Canadian tour is an example of the extent that Canadians adults fear the influence American idol on their children. Many schools banned students from attending his event. Some schools even forced students to sign an oath to not attend the event. One woman who as a student at the time recollected “I went to school [the day after the concert], the nun who was my teacher asked who went and I said I went. So she called me out into the hall and she told me I was no longer welcomed at the school and that my soul was condemned to hell. I was devastated.” (“Cultural”). Consequently, Canadians are concerned as people that they and especially their children look up to are American, not Canadian. If the role models of Canadian children are American and the cultures they were immersed in are American, how Canada could not be Americanized?

In conclusion, Canadians enjoyed physical prosperity in the 1950s but Canadians did not feel secure as Canada’s then meager cultural life is constantly threatened by American culture.

Works Cited

“An excellent report.” Lethbridge Herald 2 June 1951: 1. Print.

“Cultural Invasion.” CBC.ca – Canadian News Sports Entertainment Kids Docs Radio TV. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Mar. 2013. <http://www.cbc.ca/history/EPISCONTENTS>”

“Messay Report.” Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts,
Letters and Sciences
(1949-1951) Ottawa: King’s Printer. Collectionscanada. Web. 24 Mar. 2013

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It was from 1946-1963 that Canadians began to understand what it is to be proud. To take pride and recognition for the talent and potential their citizens possessed. And with the Canadian talent that was showcased, along came the enjoyment of prosperity and security. The prosperity that Canadians were in such indulgence with had to do with the successful social status they were making for themselves. To be prosperous is to be in a state of social status that is flourishing, thriving, and has the promise of good potential. And although prosperity is often associated with wealth, it can also be branched off with other factors which are, to varying degrees, independent of wealth, such as health and happiness. The feeling of security came when Canadians felt most free from danger and/ or threat. When they did not possess feelings of fear or anxiety of their social standing. And it was during this time that Canadians possessed a flourishing social status and felt confident of it. One of activities that helped in the development of these feelings was the Canadian involvement in the media.

In 1951 it was brought to attention how little the Canadian media made an effort to display Canadian culture in everyday lives. Not only that, but Canada having very little culture of its own to be portrayed. On June 2, 1951, Lethbridge Herald wrote “Covering a large variety of subjects, from radio to ballet, the Massey Report tells us that Canada has very little culture of her own, that we do not adequately support our painters, our writers, our sculptors, our actors or our dancers, that we depend far too much upon the United States for our cultural entertainment, and that we have a shocking lack of knowledge of our own country, its heritage, and its history.” Upon discovering this information, many were shocked and ashamed of what had been said. However, no matter which way it is viewed, the criticism given is truth and is fully justified.

With all eyes on film and radio it was impossible not to notice how much in fact American culture was broadcasted in Canada. And in comparison how little Canadian culture was shown. The Privy Council Office had much to say about this fact, however the most prominent note of speech was left for last, “We must not be blind, however, to the very present danger of permanent dependence.” A final sentence which left all thinking. It was time to rid of the strong dependence of the United States, and learn to depend on our own. Canadians must learn to feel security due to their culture’s ability to stand on their own two feet.

With the new discovered information being brought to attention, it was time to take action. Canadians should no longer rely solely on the United States for entertainment, and should instead bring their own heritage into the mix. It was then said in Ottawa, “In its obvious distaste for Americanization of Canadian culture the Massey Commission has recommended governmental control over radio and television which is likely to turn these media into entertainment for highbrows.” As of then, Canadian and American culture were given the chance to become more evenly balanced in Canadian media. Canadian culture only became more prosperous as its culture became more exposed to its citizens.

“It is desirable that the Canadian people should know as much as possible about their country, its history and traditions; and about their national life and common achievements;” said the Excerpt from the Preamble of the Order-in-Council Establishing the Massey Commission. And with thanks to Canadian programing, the knowledge of history and traditions that the Canadian people have been lacking can finally be restored. With controlled television and radio, citizens will come to learn more of their cultures, and children will grow up knowing that American culture isn’t all that is out there.

The prosperity Canadians feel when being able to say they truly understand their country and peoples’ culture cannot be matched. Their feelings on their own social status positive due to the clarity of their culture they have received. And with prosperity, along came feelings of security. Security of truly knowing who we are as a Nation, and that, no longer, will American media overtake and overpower that of Canadian.

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Now a day in Canada Canadians live their lives in security and prosperity. Although that is the case today during the cold war in order for this goal to be achieved the government had a tough task to complete. For this task to be completed the government relied heavily on Canadian culture. At the time Canadian culture wasn’t very strong but it would soon be developed and become much stronger. Due to the cultures growth now a day you could conclude that from 1946-1963 Canadians lived in security and prosperity, this is because of the culture, more specifically the government’s involvement in the CBC (Canadian broadcasting corporation), the Massey report and the Canadian council for the arts act in 1957.

First of because of the government’s involvement with the CBC at the time it helped Canadian citizens feel secure and prosperous as well as offered enough jobs to help reinforce this thinking. The governments involvement with the CBC started when they realized how much American television Canadians watched, this led to the government helping to promote Canadian television by encouraging the CBC to continue with their plans for production of French and English television programs to air nationally. Next the government tried to convince CBC as it was the largest network in Canada to further develop radio stations from other points of origin then Toronto and Montreal. This would lead to more local news stories being discussed over the air as well as more jobs for Canadians. Finally in an attempt to boost Canada’s economic power the board of governors at CBC investigated ways of making sure that private radio broadcasters employed more local talent.

Secondly, Canada issues the Massey report. This report is the beginning of a government-sponsored organization that will exclusively finance Canadian artists. The initial reaction was that it was just a way for the government to censor what they did not approve of, but it turned out to be very useful and helped promote the arts in a major way. The job of the organization was to distribute large amounts of money to individuals or groups that that did a good job of promoting Canadian culture. This organization still runs to this day and did and has been doing an excellent job promoting and preserving Canadian culture. A few years after this organization had been formed they figured out that the majority of Canadian stations even the CBC mainly used American material as opposed to Canadian. In 1956 a recommendation was passed which confirmed CBC being Canada’s official broadcasting station, but more significantly a quota was formed. This quota said that 45% of all broadcasts had to be from Canadian origin. Also by showing more Canadian broadcasts Canadians would get a better knowledge of their own country and with all the positives at the time it would make the people feel like more of a secure and prosperous country.

Finally, the Canadian council for the arts act in 1957. This was probably the most significant development in the Canadian culture between 1946-1963, also reinforcing the most security and prosperity. The act consisted of six main points; the first point was, to work with other organizations with a similar goal to the councils. This positive act made this council appeal to all. The second point was to grant appropriate loans to Canadians studying the arts or other cultures studying the arts in Canada. This would go on to make the arts industry much more populated. The third point was to create awards for Canadians for outstanding accomplishments in the arts. Next they would arrange and sponsor performances and publications of work in the arts. The following point was, that the council would give out grants to universities and similar institutes to construct an arts program. The final main point was that the council would collaborate with other countries and organizations to increase the Canadian knowledge of the arts. All these point helped greatly grow the Canadian culture during the post WWII times and all contributed to a growing culture that would soon be very hard to match world wide. Also because of how fast our culture was growing and how strong it got, it made Canadians feel like a very secure and prosperous country.

If I were to explain security and prosperity, I would have to say that they are to many a negative feedback loop, first you get a source of income making you feel prosperous, which enables you to spend money on what you want in addition to what you need making you feel secure so you work more to get more income, and it continues from there. So if I were to define it I would have to define it as, the ability to enjoy life without feeling insecure and reinforcing it with a source of income to create opportunities to create a larger sense of security. Based on the Canadian culture from 1946-1963 it can be concluded that Canadians lived in security and prosperity, mainly because of the culture, more specifically the government’s involvement in the CBC, the Massey report and the Canadian council for the arts act in 1957.

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